Tue, 09/26/2017
Mosaic International

The Discovery Trip group visited most of the 11 centers where children are served on a daily basis. Each center visit included meeting with the center staff and at least one parish representative, often the pastor. They had the chance to meet with both office and center staff, ask questions and share experiences of working with children with disabilities. They were treated to a demonstration at the papermaking co-op and a visit to the Young Adult Farm and met the parents who make the African-print bags that Mosaic sells in the U.S.

Tue, 09/26/2017
Mosaic International

Mosaic International held an appreciation banquet as a way to publicly recognize notable achievements in service to children with intellectual disabilities. This year’s winners of the Mosaic Excellence Awards were Shaeli Urassa for day center leadership, Evaline Mremi for outreach work leadership, Sister Woinde for rehabilitation leadership, Godson Mmary for health program leadership, and Pastors Anna Makyao and Yesse Shao for pastoral leadership in support of BCC.

Tue, 09/26/2017
Mosaic International

The Mosaic International team facilitated the first Discovery Trip to Tanzania for 19 supporters, including three current Mosaic employees. This trip aimed to increase awareness about the situation of people with intellectual disabilities in Tanzania and to directly observe the work of Building a Caring Community (BCC). Other trip goals were strengthening the relationship with the local church and sharing knowledge and tools used in disability service delivery in the U.S., while creating life-long memories for children and supporters alike.

Mon, 09/25/2017
Mosaic International

A highlight of the trip was the Special Olympics event. Over 80 children participated in this event, including 20 children from the local public primary school. They were joined by 20 volunteers and 30 teachers and church representatives.

The seven competition stations, staffed by international volunteers, were in constant activity. Stations included: running, dancing, parachute throwing, jumping, climbing, ball kicking and throwing. Each child got to do all activities. All children were awarded medals at the end of the day.

Mon, 07/17/2017
Mosaic International

Donna Bright is a seasoned Tanzania traveler, (this will be her fourth trip) and has even visited the BCC centers in the past. Why is she going again? 

“On my previous visits I was so inspired by the loving care shown toward the children and amazed by their progress in learning and mobility. I look forward to seeing more progress in their development. Of course, this trip is also about building relationships with fellow travelers and those we meet along the way in Tanzania as we visit BCC locations.”

Mon, 07/17/2017
Mosaic International

Mosaic’s partner in Tanzania, Building a Caring Community (BCC), has been amazed and blessed by the volunteers who have come from all points on the globe, including a small town in Iceland. Sigridur Ingibjorg Stefansdottir, or Sigga for short, found BCC shortly after graduation when she decided to search for volunteer opportunities using her occupational therapy skills. Throughout her experience, she has learned a great deal about BCC, herself, and working with children who have disabilities. 

Mon, 07/17/2017
Mosaic International

In early June, the United Nations held its annual gathering for the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. Mosaic was present among other international organizations to advocate for people with intellectual disabilities.  

Mon, 07/17/2017
Mosaic International

Following the fall of communism in 1990, many Eastern European countries found themselves with a new crisis on their hands: tens of thousands of children locked up in state institutions across the country. Some of them were orphans, others were disabled with parents unable to care for them, while others were given up temporarily by parents who were too poor to feed them. 

Mon, 07/17/2017
Mosaic International

Following the fall of communism in 1990, many Eastern European countries found themselves with a new crisis on their hands: tens of thousands of children locked up in state institutions across the country. Some of them were orphans, others were disabled with parents unable to care for them, while others were given up temporarily by parents who were too poor to feed them. 

Wed, 04/19/2017
Mosaic International

Dear friends,

Having just returned from a field visit to Tanzania, I cannot emphasize enough the life-saving value of your support.  In a context where there are virtually no services for people with disabilities, your support plays a vital role in bringing much needed relief to families desperate for some help. 

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